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2 edition of MINORITIES AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS IN INTERWAR EUROPE found in the catalog.

MINORITIES AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS IN INTERWAR EUROPE

MAZOWER

MINORITIES AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS IN INTERWAR EUROPE

by MAZOWER

  • 133 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20810920M

The role of Kin States such as Germany and Hungary, instead, characterized the entire interwar period and conditioned the stability of Europe and the League of Nations. Finally, special cases like those of Slovakia and Bosnia are also helpful in understanding the ideas of nation and minority, and how conceptualisations of the latter have. was regarded by many observers at the time as marking the end of an era and the death of the old international order. Hopes for a peaceful future and a deep-rooted abhorrence of war as a means of settling international disputes were characteristic of large parts of British opinion in the interwar years. Pacifism, in its most general sense, was widely shared across British : Richard Davis.

Minorities and the League of Nations in Interwar Europe. Author. Mark Mazower To Dædalus issue. To read this essay or subscribe to Dædalus, visit the Dædalus access page Access now. Share. Prev ious Essay. The Nation-State, Religion, and Uncivil Society: Two Perspectives from the Periphery. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xxiv, pages ; 25 cm. Contents: Part I. Historical background: international law moves from protection of particular groups to norms of an universal character / Patrick Thornberry --Minorities and the League of Nations in interwar Europe / Mark Mazower --The internationalization of minority rights / Will Kymlicka --Part II.

  The League of Nations rightly questioned this claim, and the non-territorial autonomy model was scarcely applied beyond the Baltic region during the s. However, it is still instructive to revisit the law today, at a time when several post-communist states have adopted minority rights legislation based on similar by: 6.   DOI link for Global Minority Rights. Global Minority Rights book. Edited By Joshua Castellino. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 15 May Pub. location London. Minorities and the League of Nations in Interwar Europe. With Mark Mazower. View abstract. chapter 3 | 32 pages The internationalization of Cited by: 1.


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MINORITIES AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS IN INTERWAR EUROPE by MAZOWER Download PDF EPUB FB2

Minorities and the League of Nations in Interwar Europe THIS YEAR THE NORTHERN GREEK CITY of Thessaloniki is the Cultural Capital of Europe.

A century ago, it was known as Selanik, one of the most fascinating cities in the Otto man Empire. Roughly half itsinhabitants then were Jews, as many as lived in the whole of France.

In addition to Turks and. Minorities and the League of Nations in Interwar Europe With Mark Mazower Nazi genocide was but the most extreme variant of the international experimentation in policy towards ethnic minorities that had begun with the disintegration of the Ottoman, Habsburg, and Romanov empires in the maelstrom of World War by: 6.

This chapter examines the League of Nations system of minority guarantees as a precursor of post-Cold War efforts to protect national minorities in Central and Eastern Europe, focusing on the origins of this inter-war system, the content of its national minority guarantees, the manner in which the League’s guarantee functioned, the attitude of treaty-bund states, great powers, and the minorities.

MINORITIES AND THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS IN INTERWAR EUROPE By Mark Mazower, DAEDALUS, Spring, This year the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki is the Cultural Capital of Europe. A century ago, it was known as Selanik, one of the most fascinating cities in the Ottoman Empire.

RoughlyFile Size: KB. 7 “Minority regime” refers to the interwar system that the League of Nations created for the newly established, expanded, or defeated eastern European states, wherein the concerned states accepted to formally commit to the protection of minorities and recognized the League as guarantor of that by: The League of Nations () Summary.

American President Woodrow Wilson intended the League of Nations to be the primary body of a new style of international relations based on the cooperation of all of the nations of the world.

The League was to be centered in Geneva, Switzerland. The League of Nations, abbreviated as LN or LoN, (French: Société des Nations [sɔsjete de nɑsjɔ̃], abbreviated as "SDN" or "SdN") was the first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.

It was founded on 10 January following the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War; in U.S. president Woodrow Wilson won the Common languages: French and English. Woodrow Wilson’s vision of a general association of nations took shape in the League of Nations, founded in Its basic constitution was the Covenant—Wilson’s word, chosen, as he said, “because I am an old Presbyterian.” The Covenant was embodied in the Versailles and other peace treaties.

gious minority rights and protection in Europe. This issue had largely faded from scholarly, diplo‐ matic and legal debate since the mids.[1] While the general narrative of the creation of the minority treaties at the Paris Peace Conference and their guarantee by the League of Nations may be somewhat familiar, Carole Fink's book expands.

Less than Nations: Central-Eastern European Minorities after WWI represents the result of research that the author has carried over recent years, and was facilitated by the PRIN project (Programmi di Ricerca di Rilevante Interesse Nazionale) and the Sapienza Research funds.

The book analyses the conditions of national minorities after World War I, when the geo-political map of. The League of Nations has been similarly characterized. Yet democracy endured across the Continent, threatened far more by Nazism than by internal actors. The League’s democratic internationalism failed to prevent a second world war, sanctioned Great Power imperialism, and neglected minority problems especially in Eastern : Andrea Orzoff.

Abstract. The First World War led to far-reaching border changes in Europe. As a consequence, a series of new minorities was created.

In order to make sure that these minorities were treated properly and to avoid the creation of new national conflicts several states had to assume obligations for the protection of these by: 1. Less than Nations: Central-Eastern European Minorities after WWI, Volume 1, By Giuseppe Motta This book first published Cambridge Scholars Publishing 12 Back Chapman Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE6 2XX, UK British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

I test this theory against two regional security regimes in Central and Eastern Europe: the interwar minorities regime under the League of Nations (German minorities in central Europe, Hungarian minorities in the Carpathian Basin, and disputes over the Aland Islands, Memel, and Danzig), and the ad hoc security regime of the post–Cold War.

19 There is a huge amount of bibliography on the system of protection of minorities implemented by the League of Nations. As a whole, the League of Nations has recently been reappraised from a more positive perspective, seen not only as a failure.

See, for instance, Hilpold, Peter, ‘ The League of Nations and the Protection of Minorities. The League of Nations may have been imperfect, but it changed the face of international politics Mark Mazower Fri 6 Nov EST Last modified on Thu 22 Feb EST.

Minority Rights from Westphalia to Berlin () 5. The League of Nations System of Minority Guarantees () 6. National Minority Questions and the Cold War Human Rights Regime () Part III: National Minorities in Contemporary Perspective 7.

National Minority. The only major provision that Wilson achieved in Europe, the League of Nations, was the most controversial in the United States. Both aisles of Congress had qualms with the idea, believing it violated the Constitution by giving power over self-defense to an international s: 7.

Here, the author makes a significant contribution to the often Eurocentric historiography of interwar minority politics and treaties (see, for example, Mark Mazower, ‘Minorities and the League of Nations in Interwar Europe’, Daedalus, xii [], 47–63).

White successfully demonstrates the way in which newly-forged international legal Author: Melanie S. Tanielian. The League of Nations occupies a fascinating yet paradoxical place in human history.

Over time, it's come to symbolize both a path to peace and to war, a promising vision of world order and a utopian illusion, an artifact of a bygone era and a beacon for one that may still come. "The problem of how to protect minorities is an old one which has lost none of its relevance.

This impressive study of the [MPS] of the League of Nations in relation to the German minority in Poland illuminates a classic example of the problem: the conflict between a new nation state and a previously powerful minority supported by an outside power, and at another level the conflict between a.Mazower, Mark (), "Minorities and the League of Nations in interwar Europe", Daedalus, (2): 47–63, JSTOR Mowat, C.

L. ed. (). The New Cambridge Modern History, Vol. The Shifting Balance of World Forces, – (2nd ed.). – 25 chapters by experts; pp; the first edition () edited by David Thompson has the.A summary of Attempts at Reconciliation and Disarmament () in 's The Interwar Years ().

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Interwar Years () and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.